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Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit - A Guide

You may be awarded Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit through a work
accident (industrial accident) or by developing an industrial disease.

The scheme does not cover certain groups of people, for example,
the self-employed, members of the armed services or some trainees.

Industrial accidents and prescribed diseases

An industrial accident is an incident or series of discrete identifiable incidents that result in personal injury. A prescribed disease is an industrial disease “prescribed” by regulations to be included in the Industrial Injuries Benefit Scheme. There are currently about 70 prescribed diseases. The Industrial Injuries Advisory Council is an independent body that advises the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on whether a disease should be included in the list of prescribed diseases (see list below).

Decisions about entitlement

Non-medical decision makers collect evidence to decide on claims and make decisions about entitlement.

In a claim for an industrial accident, the decision maker collects evidence to establish if there has been an incident which is an accident for entitlement purposes. In a claim for a prescribed disease, the decision maker will establish whether the person has worked in a prescribed occupation.

If the decision maker is satisfied that the person has suffered an industrial accident or has worked in a prescribed occupation, they usually seek advice from a healthcare professional working for Atos Healthcare before they make a decision on the claim.

To receive benefit, a person’s disablement has to be 1% or more for certain respiratory diseases, 20% or more for occupational deafness and 14% or more in all other cases.

Claims and payments

With some exceptions, IIDB is not payable until 90 days after the accident or date of onset of a prescribed disease. However, if the person might have had an industrial accident or prescribed disease, they should make a claim as soon as possible because there are time limits to the backdating of benefit.


The role of healthcare professionals

DWP may ask the healthcare professional responsible for the clinical care of the person to provide clinical information if it is not possible to make a decision about whether to award benefit without this. DWP usually request this information by sending form BI205 (to GPs) or BI127A (to hospitals).

In a small number of cases for prescribed diseases D3 (diffuse mesothelioma) and D8/D8a (lung cancer related to asbestos exposure), the healthcare professional responsible for the clinical care of the person may be contacted by phone to request evidence in order to confirm the diagnosis. In view of the urgency of the requirement to make a decision on benefit in these cases, it would be helpful if any documentary evidence required is supplied as quickly as possible.

Workmen’s Compensation Supplement:

If you had an accident at work or contracted an industrial disease before 5 July 1948 and you are entitled to weekly payments of Workingmen’s compensation, you may be able to get this tax-free supplement.

Industrial injuries compensation:

If you are injured at work through the fault of your employer, you may be able to claim compensation from that employer. The amount payable can depend on how badly you were injured or disabled, loss of earnings and any negligence on the part of your employer or employees. Your employer has to display a certificate of insurance covering liability for this compensation


More Information: Ask a solicitor or your trade union. The secretary of the local law society will give you an introduction to a solicitor - see the law list in a public library or see Law Centres

List of diseases covered by Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

List of diseases which are covered and the kinds of jobs which are included. It is not a complete list of jobs and you should not be put off claiming just because your job is not listed. If in doubt, claim.

Disease Number Name of disease or injury Type of job
Conditions due to physical agents (physical cause) Any job involving
A1 Leukaemia (other than chronic lymphatic leukaemia) or cancer of the bone, female breast, testis or thyroid. Exposure to electromagnetic radiations (other than radiant heat) or to ionising particles where the dose is sufficient to double the risk of the occurrence of the condition.For example, people working in the nuclear industry and hospital X-ray departments.
A2 Cataract Frequent or prolonged exposure to radiation from red-hot or white-hot material. For example, glass and metal workers, stokers.
A3 Dysbarism, including decompression sickness, barotrauma and osteonecrosis. For example, the bends. Subjection to compressed or rarefied air or other respirable gases or gaseous mixtures. For example, underwater or tunnel workers
A4 Task specific focal dystonia. For example, writer’s cramp. Prolonged periods of handwriting, typing or other repetitive movements of the fingers, hand or arm. For example, typists and clerks.
A5 Subcutaneous cellulitis of the hand. Manual labour causing severe or prolonged friction or pressure on the hand. For example, miners and road workers using picks and shovels.
A6 Bursitis or subcutaneous cellulitis arising at or about the knee due to severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the knee. For example, housemaid’s knee Manual labour causing severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the knee. For example, workers who kneel a lot.
A7 Bursitis or subcutaneous cellulitis arising at or about the elbow due to severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the elbow. Manual labour causing severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the elbow. For example, jobs involving continuous rubbing or pressure on the elbow.
A8 Traumatic inflammation of the tendons of the hand or forearm, or of the associated tendon sheaths. Tenosynovitis. Manual labour, or frequent or repeated movements of the hand or wrist. For example, routine assembly workers.
A10 Occupational deafness. Sensorineural hearing loss amounting to at least 50dB in each ear, being the average of hearing losses at 1, 2 and 3 kHz frequencies, and being due in the case of at least one ear to occupational noise. The use of, or work wholly or mainly in the immediate vicinity of the use of, a:
(a) band saw, circular saw or cutting disc to cut metal in the metal founding or forging industries, circular saw to cut products in the manufacture of steel, powered (other than hand powered) grinding tool on metal (other than sheet metal or plate metal), pneumatic percussive tool on metal, pressurised air arc tool to gouge metal, burner or torch to cut or dress steel-based products, skid transfer bank, knock out and shake out grid in a foundry, machine (other than a power press machine) to forge metal including a machine used to drop stamp metal by means of closed or open dies or drop hammers, machine to cut or shape or clean metal nails, or plasma spray gun to spray molten metal;
(b) pneumatic percussive tool to drill rock in a quarry, on stone in a quarry works, underground, for mining coal, for sinking a shaft, or for tunnelling in civil engineering works;
(c) vibrating metal moulding box in the concrete products industry, or circular saw to cut concrete masonry blocks;
(d) machine in the manufacture of textiles for weaving man-made or natural fibres (including mineral fibres), high speed false twisting of fibres, or the mechanical cleaning of bobbins
(e) multi-cutter moulding machine on wood, planing machine on wood, automatic or semiautomatic lathe on wood, multiple cross-cut machine on wood, automatic shaping machine onwood, double-end tenoning machine on wood, vertical spindle moulding machine (including a high speed routing machine) onwood, edge banding machine on wood, bandsawing machine (with a blade width of not less than 75 millimetres) on wood, circular sawing machine on wood including one operated by moving the blade towards the material being cut, or chain saw on wood;
(f) jet of water (or mixture of water and abrasive material) at a pressure above 680 bar, or jet channelling process to burn stone in a quarry;
(g) machine in a ship’s engine room, or gas turbine for performance testing on a test bed, installation testing of a replacement engine in an aircraft, or acceptance testing of an Armed Service fixed wing combat aircraft;
(h) machine in the manufacture of glass containers or hollow ware for automatic moulding, automatic blow moulding, or automatic glass pressing and forming;
(i) spinning machine using compressed air to produce glass wool or mineral wool;
(j) continuous glass toughening furnace;
(k) firearm by a police firearms training officer; or
(l) shot-blaster to carry abrasives in air for cleaning.
A11 a) Intense blanching of the skin, with a sharp demarcation line between affected and non-affected skin, where the blanching is cold-induced, episodic, occurs throughout the year and affects the skin of the distal with the middle and proximal phalanges, or distal with the middle phalanx (or in the case of a thumb the distal with the proximal phalanx), of –
(i) in the case of a person with 5 fingers (including thumb) on one hand, any 3 of those fingers, or

(ii) in the case of a person with only 4 such fingers, any 2 of those fingers, or

(iii) in the case of a person with less than 4 such fingers, any one of them or, as the case may be, the one remaining finger,

where none of the person's fingers was subject to any degree of cold-induced, episodic blanching of the skin prior to the person's employment in an occupation described in the third column in relation to this paragraph, or

(b) significant, demonstrable reduction in both sensory perception and manipulative dexterity with continuous numbness or continuous tingling all present at the same time in the distal phalanx of any finger (including thumb) where none of the person's fingers was subject to any degree of reduction in sensory perception, manipulative dexterity, numbness or tingling prior to the person's employment in an occupation described in the second column in relation to this paragraph,

where the symptoms in paragraph (a) or paragraph (b) were caused by vibration.
(a) the use of hand-held chain saws on wood; or
(b) the use of hand-held rotary tools in grinding or in the sanding or polishing of metal, or the holding of material being ground, or metal being sanded or polished, by rotary tools; or
(c) the use of hand-held percussive metalworking tools, or the holding of metal being worked upon by percussive tools, in riveting, caulking, chipping, hammering, fettling or swaging; or
(d) the use of hand-held powered percussive drills or hand-held powered percussive hammers in mining, quarrying, demolition, or on roads or footpaths, including road construction; or
(e) the holding of material being worked upon by pounding machines in shoe manufacture.
A12 Carpal tunnel syndrome (a) The use, at the time the symptoms first develop, of hand-held powered tools whose internal parts vibrate so as to transmit that vibration to the hand, but excluding those tools which are solely powered by hand; or
(b) repeated palmar flexion and dorsiflexion of the wrist for at least 20 hours per week for a period or periods amounting in aggregate to at least 12 months in the 24 months prior to the onset of symptoms. We use “repeated” to mean once or more often in every thirty seconds.
A13 Osteoarthritis of the hip Work in agriculture as a farmer or farm worker for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 10 years or more.
A14 Osteoarthritis of the knee Work underground in a coal mine for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, at least 10 years in any one or more of the following occupations:
(a) before 1 January 1986 as a coal miner; or
(b) on or after 1 January 1986 as a:
(i) face worker working on a non-mechanised coal face;
(ii) development worker;
(iii) face salvage worker;
(iv) conveyor belt cleaner; or
(v) conveyor belt attendant.
A “non-mechanised coal face” means a coal face without either powered roof supports or a power loader machine which simultaneously cuts and loads the coal or without both.
B
Disease Number Name of disease or injury Type of job
Conditions due to biological agents (caused by animal, plant or other living organism) Any job involving
B1 Anthrax (a) Contact with anthrax spores, including contact with animals infected by anthrax; or
(b) handling, loading, unloading or transport of animals of a type susceptible to infection with anthrax or of the products or residues of such animals
B2 Glanders Contact with equine animals or their carcasses. For example, farm and slaughterhouse workers, and grooms handling horses.
B3 Infection by leptospira. For example, swamp fever, swineherd’s disease, and Weil’s disease. (a) Work in places which are, or are liable to be, infested by rats, field mice or voles, or other small mammals; or
(b) work at dog kennels or the care or handling of dogs; or
(c) contact with bovine animals or their meat products or pigs or their meat products. For example, farm, veterinary, sewerage and slaughterhouse workers.
B4 Ankylostomiasis Contact with a source of ankylostomiasis
B5 Tuberculosis. TB infection. Contact with a source of tuberculous infection.
For example, doctors, nurses, ambulance crews, pathology technicians and social workers.
B6 Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (including farmer’s lung). Exposure to moulds or fungal spores or heterologous proteins by reason of employment in:
(a) agriculture, horticulture, forestry, cultivation of edible fungi or malt-working; or
(b) loading or unloading or handling in storage mouldy vegetable matter or edible fungi; or
(c) caring for or handling birds; or
(d) handling bagasse.
(e) work involving exposure to metalworking fluids mists.
B7 Infection by organisms of the genus brucella. Brucellosis. Contact with:
(a) animals infected by brucella, or their carcasses or parts thereof, or their untreated products; or
(b) laboratory specimens or vaccines of, or containing, brucella. For example, farm, veterinary, slaughterhouse, animal laboratory workers.
B8A Infection by hepatitis A virus Contact with raw sewage
B8B Infection by hepatitis B or C virus Contact with:
(a) human blood or human blood products; or
(b) any other source of hepatitis B or C virus
B9 Infection by Streptococcus suis. A very rare form of meningitis from exposure to infected pigs or pork products. Contact with pigs infected by Streptococcus suis, or with the carcasses, products or residues of pigs so infected. For example, pork butchers, pig breeders, slaughterhouse workers.
B10(a) Avian chlamydiosis Contact with birds infected with chlamydia psittaci, or with the remains or untreated products of such birds. For example, duck farm workers, feather processing workers, abattoir workers, poultry meat inspectors, pet shop owners and assistants.
B10(b) Ovine chlamydiosis. Contact with sheep infected with chlamydia psittaci, or with the remains or untreated products of such sheep. For example, sheep farm workers, veterinary surgeons.
B11 Q fever. Contact with animals, their remains or their untreated products. For example, farm workers involved in the rearing of sheep, abattoir workers, veterinary surgeons.
B12 Orf. Contact with sheep or goats, or with the carcasses of sheep or goats. For example, farm workers, abattoir workers, meat inspectors.
B13 Hydatidosis. Contact with dogs. For example, shepherds, veterinarians and people who care for dogs.
B14 Lyme disease Exposure to deer or other mammals of a type liable to harbour ticks harbouring Borrelia bacteria
B15 Anaphylaxis Employment as a healthcare worker having contact with products made with natural rubber latex
C
Disease Number Name of disease or injury Type of job
Conditions due to chemical agents (chemical cause) Any job involving
C1(a) Anaemia with a haemoglobin concentration of 9g/dL or less, and a blood film showing punctate basophilia; The use or handling of, and exposure to the fumes, dust or vapour of, lead or a compound of lead, or a substance containing lead.
C1(b) peripheral neuropathy For example, plumbers, painters, enamellers, pottery glazing workers.
C1(c) central nervous system toxicity.
C2 Central nervous system toxicity characterised by parkinsonism. The use or handling of, or exposure to the fumes, dust or vapour of, manganese or a compound of manganese, or a substance containing manganese. For example, dry battery, pottery glazing and soap workers.
C3 Poisoning by phosphorus or an inorganic compound of phosphorus or poisoning due to the anticholinesterase or pseudo anticholinesterase action of organic phosphorus compounds. The use or handling of, or exposure to the fumes, dust or vapour of, phosphorus or a compound of phosphorus, or a substance containing phosphorus. For example, pest control, agricultural workers, workers on incendiary devices, match makers.
C4 Primary carcinoma of the bronchus or lung. Exposure to the fumes, dust or vapour of arsenic, a compound of arsenic or a substance containing arsenic.
C5(a) Central nervous system toxicity characterised by tremor and neuropsychiatric disease. Exposure to mercury or inorganic compounds of mercury for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 10 years or more.
C5(b) Central nervous system toxicity characterised by combined cerebellar and cortical degeneration. Exposure to methylmercury.
C6 Peripheral neuropathy The use or handling of, or exposure to the fumes or vapour of, carbon disulphide (also called carbon disulfide)
C7 Acute non-lymphatic leukaemia Exposure to benzene
C12(a) Peripheral neuropathy; Exposure to methyl bromide (also called bromomethane).
C12(b) Central nervous system toxicity
C13 Cirrhosis of the liver Exposure to chlorinated naphthalenes
C16(a) Neurotoxicity; Exposure to the dust of gonioma kamassi
C16(b) cardiotoxicity
C17 Chronic beryllium disease Inhalation of beryllium or a beryllium compound
C18 Emphysema Inhalation of cadmium fumes for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 20 years or more.
C19(a) Peripheral neuropathy; Exposure to acrylamide
C19(b) central nervous system toxicity
C20 Dystrophy of the cornea (including ulceration of the corneal surface) of the eye. Wasting and ulceration of the corneal surface of the eye Exposure to quinone or hydroquinone
C21 Primary carcinoma of the skin Exposure to arsenic or arsenic compounds, tar, pitch, bitumen, mineral oil (including paraffin) or soot
C22(a) Primary carcinoma of the mucous membrane of the nose or paranasal sinuses; Work before 1950 in the refining of nickel involving exposure to oxides, sulphides or water-soluble compounds of nickel.
C22(b) primary carcinoma of the bronchus or lung
C23 Primary neoplasm of the epithelial lining of the urinary tract. (a) The manufacture of 1-naphthylamine, 2-naphthylamine, benzidine, auramine, magenta or 4-aminobiphenyl (also called biphenyl-4-ylamine);
(b) work in the process of manufacturing methylene-bisorthochloroaniline (also called
MbOCA) for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 12 months or more;
(c) exposure to 2-naphthylamine, benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl (also called biphenyl-4-ylamine) or salts of those compounds otherwise than in the manufacture of those compounds;
(d) exposure to orthotoluidine, 4-chloro-2-methylaniline or salts of those compounds; or
(e) exposure for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 5 years or more, to coal tar pitch volatiles produced in aluminium smelting involving the Soderberg process (that is to say, the method of producing aluminium by electrolysis in which the anode consists of a paste of petroleum coke and mineral oil which is baked in situ).
C24 (a) Angiosarcoma of the liver; or
(b) osteolysis of the terminal phalanges of the fingers; or
(c) Sclerodermatous thickening of the skin of the hands; or
(d) Liver fibrosis due to exposure to vinyl chloride monomer
Exposure to vinyl chloride monomer in the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride
C24A Raynaud’s phenomenon due to exposure to vinyl chloride monomer Exposure to vinyl chloride monomer in the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride before 1 January 1984
C25 Vitiligo. The use or handling of, or exposure to, paratertiarybutylphenol(also called 4-tertbutylphenol), paratertiarybutylcatechol (also called 4-tertbutylcatechol), para-amylphenol (also called p-pentyl phenol isomers), hydroquinone, monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone (also called 4-benzyloxyphenol) or mono-butyl ether of hydroquinone (also called 4-butoxyphenol).
C26(a) Liver toxicity; The use or handling of, or exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (also called tetrachloromethane).
C26(b) kidney toxicity.
C27 Liver toxicity. The use or handling of, or exposure to, trichloromethane (also called chloroform).
C29 Peripheral neuropathy The use or handling of, or exposure to, n-hexane or n-butyl methyl ketone
C30(a) Dermatitis; The use or handling of, or exposure to, chromic acid, chromates or dichromates.
C30(b) ulceration of the mucous membrane or the epidermis.
D
Disease Number Name of disease or injury Type of job
Miscellaneous conditions not included elsewhere in the list Any job involving
D1 Pneumoconiosis. Includes silicosis and asbestosis. (1) (a) The mining, quarrying or working of silica rock or the working of dried quartzose sand or any dry deposit or dry residue of silica or any dry admixture containing such materials (including any occupation in which any of the aforesaid operations are carried out incidentally to the mining or quarrying of other minerals or to the manufacture of articles containing crushed or ground silica rock);
(b) the handling of any of the materials specified in the foregoing subparagraph in or incidental to any of the operations mentioned therein, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from such operations.
(2) The breaking, crushing or grinding of flint or the working or handling of broken, crushed or ground flint or materials containing such flint, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from any such operations.
(3) Sand blasting by means of compressed air with the use of quartzose sand or crushed silica rock or flint, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from sand and blasting.
(4) Work in a foundry or the performance of, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from, any of the following operations:
(a) the freeing of steel castings from adherent siliceous substance;
(b) the freeing of metal castings from adherent siliceous substance:
(i) by blasting with an abrasive propelled by compressed air, by steam or by a wheel, or
(ii) by the use of powerdriven tools.
(5) The manufacture of china or earthenware (including sanitary earthenware, electrical earthenware and earthenware tiles), and any occupation involving substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(6) The grinding of mineral graphite, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from such grinding.
(7) The dressing of granite or any igneous rock by masons or the crushing of such materials, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from such operations.
(8) The use, or preparation for use, of a grindstone, or substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(9) (a) The working or handling of asbestos or any admixture of asbestos;
(b) the manufacture or repair of asbestos textiles or other articles containing or composed of asbestos;
(c) the cleaning of any machinery or plant used in any foregoing operations and of any chambers, fixtures and appliances for the collection of asbestos dust;
(d) substantial exposure to the dust arising from any of the foregoing operations.
(10)(a) Work underground in any mine in which one of the objects of the mining operations is the getting of any mineral;
(b) the working or handling above ground at any coal or tin mine of any minerals extracted therefrom, or any operation incidental thereto;
(c) the trimming of coal in any ship, barge, or lighter, or in any dock or harbour or at any wharf or quay;
(d) the sawing, splitting or dressing of slate, or any operation incidental thereto.
(11) The manufacture of carbon electrodes by an industrial undertaking for use in the electrolytic extraction of aluminium from aluminium oxide, and any occupation involving substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(12) Boiler scaling or substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(13) Exposure to dust if the person employed in it has never at any time worked in any of the other occupations listed.
D2 Byssinosis. A respiratory condition. Work in any room where any process up to and including the weaving process is performed in a factory in which the spinning or manipulation of raw or waste cotton or of flax, or the weaving of cotton or flax, is carried on. For example, cotton or flax workers.
D3 Diffuse mesothelioma (primary neoplasm of the mesothelium of the pleura or of the pericardium or of the peritoneum). A cancer starting in the covering of the lungs or the lining of the abdomen. Exposure to asbestos, asbestos dust or any admixture of asbestos at a level above that commonly found in the environment at large.
D4 Allergic rhinitis which is due to exposure to any of the following agents: Exposure to any of the agents set out in column 2 of this paragraph. Wide range of occupations for example, metal plating industry, food processing, laboratory workers, grain processing, drug manufacture, washing powder manufacture, hair dressing, electronics industry, welders, dye tea and coffee processing.
(a) isocyanates
(b) platinum salts
(c) fumes of dusts arising from the manufacture, transport or use of hardening agents (including epoxy resin curing agents) based on phthalic anhydride, tetrachlorophthalic anhydride, trimellitic anhydride or triethylenetetramine
(d) fumes arising from the use of rosin as a soldering flux
(e) proteolytic enzymes
(f) animals including insects and other anthropods used for the purposes of research or education or in laboratories
(g) dusts arising from the sowing, cultivation, harvesting, drying, handling, milling, transport or storage of barley, oats, rye, wheat or maize, or the handling,
milling, transport or storage of meal or flour made therefrom
(h) antibiotics
(i) cimetidine
(j) wood dust
(k) ispaghula
(l) castor bean dust
(m) ipecacuanha
(n) azodicarbonamide
(o) animals including insects and other arthropods or their larval forms used for the purposes of pest control or fruit cultivation, or the larval forms of animals used for the purposes of research, education or in laboratories
(p) glutaraldehyde
(q) persulphate salts or henna
(r) crustaceans or fish or products arising from these in the food processing industry
(s) reactive dyes
(t) soya bean
(u) tea dust
(v) green coffee bean dust
(w) fumes from stainless steel welding. For example, hay fever symptoms.
(x) products made with natural rubber latex
D5 Non-infective dermatitis of external origin (excluding dermatitis due to ionising particles or electromagnetic radiations other than radiant heat). For example, skin rash, dermatitis. Exposure to dust, liquid or vapour or any other external agent except chromic acid, chromates or bi-chromates, capable of irritating the skin (including friction or heat but excluding ionising particles or electromagnetic radiations other than radiant heat). For example, any job involving exposure to a substance which can irritate the skin except for jobs involving exposure to chromium compounds (see C30) and radiation.
D6 Carcinoma of the nasal cavity or associated air sinuses (nasal carcinoma). Cancer of the nose. (a) Attendance for work in or about a building where wooden goods are manufactured or repaired; or
(b) attendance for work in a building used for the manufacture of footwear or components of footwear made wholly or partly of leather or fibreboard; or
(c) attendance for work at a place used wholly or mainly for the repair of footwear made wholly or partly of leather or fibreboard.
D7 Asthma which is due to exposure to any of the following agents: Exposure to any of the agents set out in column 2 of this paragraph.
(a) isocyanates
(b) platinum salts
(c) fumes or dusts arising from the manufacture, transport or use of hardening agents (including epoxy resin curing agents) based on phthalic anhydride, tetrachlorophthalic anhydride, trimellitic anhydride or triethylenetetramine
(d) fumes arising from the use of rosin as a soldering flux
(e) proteolytic enzymes
(f) animals including insects and other arthropods used for the purposes of research or education or in laboratories
(g) dusts arising from the sowing, cultivation, harvesting, drying, handling, milling, transport or storage of barley, oats, rye, wheat or maize, or the handling, milling, transport or storage of meal or flour made therefrom
(h) antibiotics
(i) cimetidine
(j) wood dust
(k) ispaghula
(l) castor bean dust
(m) ipecacuanha
(n) azodicarbonamide
(o) animals including insects and other arthropods or their larval forms, used for the purposes of pest control or fruit cultivation, or the larval forms of animals used for the purposes of research, education or in laboratories
(p) glutaraldehyde
(q) persulphate salts or henna
(r) crustaceans or fish or products arising from these in the food processing industry
(s) reactive dyes
(t) soya bean
(u) tea dust
(v) green coffee bean dust
(w) fumes from stainless steel welding
(wa) products made with natural rubber latex
(x) any other sensitising agent. (Occupational asthma)
D8 Primary carcinoma of the lung where there is accompanying evidence of asbestosis (a) The working or handling of asbestos or any admixture of asbestos; or
(b) the manufacture or repair of asbestos textiles or other articles containing or composed of asbestos; or
(c) the cleaning of any machinery or plant used in any of the foregoing operations and of any chambers, fixtures and appliances for the collection of asbestos dust; or
(d) substantial exposure to the dust arising from any of the foregoing operations.
D8A Primary carcinoma of the lung Exposure to asbestos, in the course of:
(a) The manufacture of asbestos textiles; or
(b) spraying asbestos; or
(c) asbestos insulation work; or
(d) applying or removing materials containing asbestos in the course of ship building,
where all or any of the exposure occurs before 1 January 1975, for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, five years or more, or otherwise, for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, ten years or more.
D9 Unilateral or bilateral diffuse pleural thickening with obliteration of the costophrenic angle As D8 above
D10 Primary carcinoma of the lung. (a) Work underground in a tin mine; or
(b) exposure to bis (chloromethyl) ether produced during the manufacture of chloromethyl methyl ether; or
(c) exposure to zinc chromate, calcium chromate or strontium chromate in their pure forms.
D11 Primary carcinoma of the lung where there is accompanying silicosis. Exposure to silica dust in the course of:
(a) the manufacture of glass or pottery
(b) tunnelling in, or quarrying sandstone or granite
(c) mining metal ores
(d) slate quarrying or the manufacturing of artefacts from slate.
(e) mining clay
(f) using siliceous materials as abrasives
(g) cutting stone
(h) stonemasonry
(i) work in a foundry.
D12 Chronic bronchitis or emphysema; or both where, with maximum effort, where there is evidence of a forced expiratory volume in one second which is:(i) at least one litre below the appropriate mean value predicted, obtained from the following prediction formulae which give the mean values predicted in litres:
  • For a man, where the measurement is made without back-extrapolation, (3.62 x Height in metres) minus (0.031 x Age in years) minus 1.41; or, where the measurement is made with back-extrapolation, (3.71 x Height in metres) minus (0.032 x Age in years) minus 1.44
  • For a woman, where the measurement is made without back-extrapolation, (3.29 x Height in metres) minus (0.029 x Age in years) minus 1.42; or, where the measurement is made with back-extrapolation, (3.37 x Height in metres) minus (0.030 x Age in years) minus 1.46 (b) or less than one litre.
Exposure to coal dust (whether before or after 5th July 1948) by reason of working–
(a) underground in a coal mine for a period or periods amounting in aggregate to at least 20 years;
(b) on the surface of a coal mine as a screen worker for a period or periods amounting in aggregate to at least 40 years before 1st January 1983; or
(c) both underground in a coal mine, and on the surface as a screen worker before 1st January 1983, where 2 years working as a surface screen worker is equivalent to 1 year working underground, amounting in aggregate to at least the equivalent of 20 years underground.
Any such period or periods shall include a period or periods of incapacity while engaged in such an occupation.
D13 Primary carcinoma of the nasopharynx Exposure to wood dust in the course of the processing of wood or the manufacture or repair of wood products, for a period or periods which amount in aggregate to at least 10 years.”.
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